XML supports shareable structure (using DTDs)

Since the structure of the XML document can be specified in DTDs they provide a simple way to make it easier to exchange XML documents that conform to a DTD. For example, if two software systems need to exchange information, then if both of the systems conform to one DTD, the two systems can process information from each other. DTDs are not as powerful as some kind of schema architecture for XML, they don't support typing, subclassing, or instantiation mechanisms that a schema architecture must have.

DTDs are a simple way to make sure that 2 or more XML documents are of the same "type". Its a very limited approach to making "typed" XML documents shareable across systems. In the future some kind of schema system will be proposed by the W3C that should allow typing, instantiation and inheritance of information (in XML).

XML enables interoperability

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very good about that sort of thing yet -- in fact, as of this writing, no browser will correctly place images in the backgrounds of form elements.

WARNING

Just like background-color, background-image is not inherited -- in fact, none of the background properties are inherited. Remember also that when specifying the URL of a background image, it falls under theDIV, or another TABLE. Thus, ifan image has a border, and the BODY is its parent,given this rule:

BODY {color: purple;}

then, by default, the border around the image will be purple. Ofcourse, to get that border to appear, you have to do a little workfirst.

"upright" text, which is probably best described as "text that is not italic or otherwise slanted." The vast majority of text in this book is upright, for instance.

That leaves only an explanation of the difference between italic and oblique text. For