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Index: U

U element: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
UA (see user agent)
underlining: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
changing color of: 4.1.6.1. Weird decorations
removing from hyperlinks: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
turned off by browsers: 4.1.6.1. Weird decorations
Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): 3.5. CSS2 Units
Uniform Resource Locators (see URLs)
units: 11.1.3. Case 3: Putting a Magazine Article Online
(see also length units; CSS2 units)
as a strip of paper with marginal plastic surrounding it. Displayingthe inline element on multiple lines is like cutting up the stripinto smaller strips. However, no extra plastic is added to eachsmaller strip. The only plastic used is that which was on the stripto begin with, so it only appears at the beginning and end of theinline element.

universal selector: 10.2.1.1. Universal selector
unordered lists: 7.7.1. Types of Lists
unvisited anchors: 2.4.1. Pseudo-Class Selectors
uppercase text: 4.1.5. Text Transformation
upright text: 5.4.1. Fonts with Style
URI (Uniform Resource Identifier): 3.5. CSS2 Units
URLs (Uniform Resource Locators): 3.4. URLs
HREF attribute and: 1.4.1.1. LINK attributes
referring to in style sheets: 3.4. URLs
specifying for images: 6.2.1. Background Images
user agent (UA): 2.2.2. Grouping Declarations
2.2.2. Grouping Declarations
(see also browsers)
users, selecting alternate style sheets: 1.4.1.2. Alternate style sheets


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upper-alpha | lower-alpha | upper-roman | lower-roman | none

The meaning of these values is shown in Table 7-1.

Table 7-1. Values of the list-style property and their results

These properties can only be applied to any element that has aelements. For the BODY, we can see the entire repeat pattern. For the H1, however, the only place we can see its background is in the padding and content of the H1 itself. Since both background images are the same size, and they have precisely the same origin position, they appear to "line up" as shown in Figure 6-57.

WARNING

There's a downside: as of this writing, web browsers don't get this fixed alignment right, so this example was just

H2 {color: rgb(25.5%,40%,98.6%);}

Actually, there is a problem. Some user agents may not recognize decimal values, and still others could interpret them as if the decimal wasn't there, which would lead them to think the preceding value is actually rgb(255%,40%,986%). In that case, assuming the user agent behaves correctly, the out-of-range values will be "clipped" to the nearest legal value -- in this case, 100%. Thus, a user agent which ignores the decimalA:visited {color: #333333;} /* a very dark gray */

Figure 6-4

Figure 6-4. Changing colors of hyperlinks

This sets all anchors with the class external (<A CLASS="external" HREF="...">) to be silver, instead of medium gray. They'll still be a dark gray once they've been visited, of course, unless you add a special rule for that as well:

BODY {color: black;}
A:link {color: #808080;}      /* medium gray */the registered domain name, e.g., udel.edu.  Some web
servers are configured as virtual hosts serving files under multiple
server names and domains.

The path and filename in a URL are typically specified from the root of the web-server directory, which is some subdirectory of the server's local file system.  For security reasons, browsers can't access stuff outside the web-server directory. 

URLs can specify files by  relative or absolute path.  A relative URL specifies a file relative to the location of the file containing the URL.  An absolute URL specifies the full server name and path