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Index: M

margin-bottom property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin-left property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin property: 7.3. Margins
margin-right property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin-top property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margins: 7. Boxes and Borders
7.3. Margins
collapsing: 7.3.5. Collapsing Margins
block-level elements: 8.2.1.2. Collapsing vertical margins
floated elements: 7.6.1. Floated Elements
horizontal, noncollapsing: 8.2.2. Horizontal Formatting
inline elements and: 7.3.7. Margins and Inline Elements
caution with: 7.3.8. Margins: Known Issues
length values and: 7.3.1. Length Values and Margins
negative (see negative margins)
vs. padding: 7.2. Margins or Padding?
percentages and: 7.3.2. Percentages and Margins
replication: 7.3.3. Replicating Values
single side, setting margin for: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
table cells and: 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
markers: 8.2.3. List Items
8.2.3. List Items
10.4.2. Markers
matching hyphenated values: 10.2.2.5. Matching hyphenated values
matching single attribute values: 10.2.2.3. Matching single attribute values
max-height property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
max-width property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
media types: 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
10.8. Media Types and @-rules
Microsoft Internet Explorer (see Internet Explorer)
middle alignment: 4.1.3.5. In the middle
millimeters (mm): 3.2.1. Absolute Length Units
min-height property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
min-max properties: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
min-width property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
monospace fonts: 5.1. Font Families
multiple pages, using styles on: 1.2.3. Using Your Styles on Multiple Pages


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If you want an exact match, you can use an ordinary attribute selector. Thus, the following rule:

<P CLASS="driving directions" >This is a side note (and it's green).</P>

If you aren't quite so concerned about exact matching, you can string class selectors together. This is a new feature of CSS2, and with this approach, you can match a class attribute with a value of driving directions in this way: All Rights Reserved.

Figure 6-6

Figure 6-6. Border colors are taken from the content's color

This will result in the element <P CLASS="aside"> having gray text and a gray medium-width solid border. That's because the foreground color is applied to the borders by default. The basic way to override that is with the property border-color:

P.aside {color: gray; border-style: solid; border-color: black;}

This will make the text gray, but the borders will unfortunately.

WARNING

Something else to watch out for is Navigator 4's handling of values for color that it doesn't recognize. If Navigator 4 encounters an unknown word (such as invalidValue) somehow, through mechanisms known only to itself, it actually arrives at and uses a color. It doesn't do so randomly, exactly, but the effect is practically the same. For example, invalidValue comes out as a oversized text intrudes into other lines even more than before.

Let's consider another situation where another inline element is in the same line as the boldfaced text, but its alignment is other than the baseline:

<P STYLE="font-size: 12px; line-height: 12px;">
This is text, <EM>some of which is emphasized</EM>, plus other text<BR>
which is <B STYLE="font-size: 24px;">boldfaced</B>
and <SPAN STYLE="vertical-align: top;">tall</SPAN> and which is<BR>