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Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book

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Index: J

JavaScript
Netscape Navigator preferences: 11.2.1. Making Styles Work
reapplying styles: 11.2.10. Disappearing Styles
JavaScript Style Sheets (JSSS): 11.2.1. Making Styles Work
justifying text: 4.1.1.2. Aligning text
11.1.3. Case 3: Putting a Magazine Article Online


Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat.</P>

Figure 9-22

Figure 9-22. Another approach to defining a "change bar"

Remember when we mentioned static-position muchearlier in the chapter? Here's one example of how it works andhow it can be very useful.

Another important point is that when an element is positioned, itestablishes a containing block for its descendantelements. For example, we could absolutely position an element andthen absolutely position one of its children, as shown in Figure 9-23. | Y | Z


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8.2.2.3. More than one auto

Now let us consider the cases where two of these three properties areset to auto. If both the margins are set toauto, then they are set to equal lengths, thuscentering the element within its parent, as you can see from Figure 8-14:

P {width: 100px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;}
Figure 8-14

Figure 8-14. Setting an explicit width

This is the correct way to center block-level elements, as a matter