needed to display the content:

<P STYLE="height: 10em;">

In this case, then the extra height is treated somewhat like extra padding, as depicted in Figure 8-3.

Figure 8-3

Figure 8-3. Setting the height property for block-level elements

If, on the other hand, the height is less than that needed to display the content:

Book HomeCascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book Monday 19th of March 2018 10:50:28 PM

Copyright © 2000 O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America.

Published by O'Reilly & Associates, Inc., 1005 Gravenstein Highway North, Sebastopol, CA 95472.

Nutshell Handbook, the Nutshell Handbook logo, and the O'Reilly logo are registered trademarks of O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. was aware of a trademark claim, the designations have been printed in caps or initial caps. The association between the image of a koala and the topic of HTML and XHTML is a trademark of O'Reilly & Associates, Inc.

While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this book, the publisher assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions, or for damages resulting from the use of the information contained herein.

Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

face exists, but there is no defined Oblique face -- the user agent may not substitute the former for the latter, according to the CSS specification. Finally, the user agent can simply generate the oblique face by computing a slanted version of the upright font. In fact, this is what most often happens in a digital world, where it's fairly easy to slant a font using a simple computation.

Furthermore, you may find that in some operating systems, a given font that has been declared to be italic may switch from being italic to oblique depending on the actual size of the padding are all part of an element's background. There are two ways to set the background color: the background-color and background properties.

6.1.1. Foreground Colors

The easiest way to set the foreground color of an element is with the property color.

7.5.4. Padding: Known Issues

In the first place, padding and Navigator 4.x just plain don't getalong. The main problem is that you can set padding on an elementwith a background color, but the background won't extend intothe padding unless you get very sneaky. You need to add a border, aswas discussed earlier in "Margins: Known Issues."Therefore, if you have a background color, some padding, and a borderset for an element, you'll see the background fill the content child of an unordered list, so it can't match the rule.Finally, the third list item in the source is a child of an orderedlist, but the OL element is the child of anLI element, so it doesn't match either. Adjacent-sibling selector

If you thought that was interesting,consider our next subject: the adjacent sibling tables, which prevent BODY colors from inheritinginto table cells:

BODY {color: red;}TABLE {color: black;}

That's because the combination of your style, and thebrowser's built-in styles looks like Figure 6-10.

Figure 6-10

Figure 6-10. The result of combining author styles and browser styles

Since there is a color value defined by the