Book HomeCascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book Friday 20th of April 2018 04:41:50 PM

3.6. Summary

Units and values cover a wide spectrum of areas, from length units to color units to the location of files (such as images). For the most part, units are the one area that user agents get almost totally correct; it's those few little bugs and quirks that get you, though. Interpreting relative URLs incorrectly, for example, has bedeviled issue, as well as give a way to clip off parts of an element.

9.1.4.1. Overflow

So let's say that you have, for whatever reason, an elementthat has been pinned to a specific size, and the contentdoesn't fit. You can take control of the situation with theoverflow property.

many authors, and leads to an over-reliance on absolute URLs. Colors are another area where user agents almost always do well, except for a few little quirks here and there. The vagaries of length units, however, far from being bugs, are an interesting problem for any author to tackle.

These units all have their advantages and drawbacks, depending on the circumstance in which they're used. We've already seen some of these, and the nuances of such circumstances will be discussed in the rest of the book, beginning with the CSS properties that describe ways to alter the way text is displayed.



Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

Figure 7-21

Figure 7-21. Margins on an inline element

This happens because margins on inline elements don't changethe line height of an element. (In fact, the only properties that canchange the distance between lines containing only text areline-height, font-size, andvertical-align.)

However, all of this is true only for the top and bottom sides ofinline elements; the left and right sides are a different story

Web-based Applications

Web-based applications are similar to app servers, except for one thing: Web-based applications don't have client apps, instead they use web browsers on the client side. They generate their front ends using HTML, which is dynamically generated by the web-based app. In the Java world, Servlets are best suited for this job.

Web-based apps might themselves rely on another app server to gather information that is presented on the client web browser. Also, you can write Servlets that get information from remote or local databases, XML document repositories and even other Servlets. One good use for web-based apps is to be a wrapper around an app server, so that you can allow your customers to access at least part of the services offered by your app server via a simple web browser. So web-based apps allow you to integrate many components including app servers, and provide access to this information over the web via a simple web browser.