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2.7. Specificity

Given the existence of inheritance, one might well wonder what happens in a circumstance such as this:

.grape {color: purple;}
H1 {color: red;}
<H1 CLASS="grape">Meerkat <EM>Central</EM></H1>

Since the selectors H1 and .grape can both match the H1 element shown, which one wins? As it happens, .grape is the correct answer, and so the H1 element will be colored purple. This happens because of the specificity of the two rules, and

font-style

Values

italic | oblique |normal

the rules CSS has to deal with such situations.

Specificity describes the relative weights of various rules. According to the specification, a simple selector (e.g., H1) has a specificity of 1, class selectors have a specificity of 10, and ID selectors a specificity of 100. Thus the following rules would have the noted specificity:

H1 {color: red;}                    /* specificity = 1 */
P EM {color: purple;}               /* specificity = 2 */
.grape {color: purple;}             /* specificity = 10 */
P.bright {color: yellow;}           /* specificity = 11 */
P.bright EM.dark {color: brown;}    /* specificity = 22 */
#id216 {color: blue;}               /* specificity = 100 */

Thus, the rule for #id216 has a much higher specificity, and therefore more weight, than any of the others listed. In cases where more than one rule can apply to an element, the styles with the higher weight win out.

2.7.1. Inheritance and Specificity

Within the framework of specificity, inherited values have, effectively, a specificity of 0. This means that any explicitly declared rule will override an inherited style. Therefore, no matter how much weight a rule might have, it is only inherited if no other rule can be applied to the inheriting element.

For example, consider the following:

BODY {background: black;}
LI {color: gray;}
UL.vital {color: white;}

You would likely expect that all list items would be gray except for those which are found in lists with a class of vital, in which case they'll be white. However, as Figure 2-26 demonstrates, this is not the case.

Figure 2-26

Figure 2-26. Apparently incorrect behavior

Why does this happen? Because the explicit declaration with the selector LI wins out over the value which might have been inherited from the UL.vital rule.

Let's look at this process in a little more detail. Given the following markup, the emphasized text will be gray, not black, since the rule for EM outweighs the value inherited from the H1:

H1#id3 {color: black;}   /* specificity = 101 */
EM {color: gray;}        /* specificity = 1 */
<H1 ID="id3">Meerkat <EM>Central</EM></H1>

This is because the specificity of the second rule (1) is higher than the specificity of the inherited value (0). The fact that the original specificity of the H1#id3 rule is 101 has no effect on the inherited value, whose weight is still 0.

If the intention is to have H1s be consistently black, while EM text in all other circumstances should be red, then the following would be a good solution:

H1, H1 EM {color: black;}   /* specificity = 1, 2 */
EM {color: red;}            /* specificity = 1 */

Given these rules, EM text in any circumstance except within an H1 will be red. However, EM text inside H1 elements will be black, because the specificity of their selector (2) is greater than that of the second rule (1). Note that since, due to selector grouping, there are effectively two rules in the first statement (one for H1 and one for H1 EM ), there are also two specificities -- one for each rule.

Elements with a STYLE attribute are defined under CSS1 to have a specificity of 100, just as though they were ID selectors such as #id3. In practice, however, this specificity value is somewhat higher, since the value of a STYLE element seems to outweigh most normal rules, even those which technically have a higher specificity (such as H1#id3 EM ). In other words, the following markup will generally have the result shown in Figure 2-27:

H1#id3 EM {color: gray;}
<H1 ID="id3">Meerkat <EM STYLE="color: black;">Central</EM>!</H1>
Figure 2-27

Figure 2-27. Inline styles have high specificity

You might choose to treat STYLE value as having a specificity value of, say, 1,000, although this interpretation is not supported by the CSS specification and so cannot be relied upon. Finally, pseudo-elements are ignored altogether when calculating specificity, but pseudo-classes are treated like regular classes.

There is one other wrinkle in the specificity picture, which is a way to pretty much override the entire specificity mechanism.

2.7.2. Importance

Ever felt like something is so important that it outweighs all other considerations? Well, it's possible to mark certain rules as being more important than others. These are called important rules due to the way in which they are declared and also because of their very nature. An important rule is marked by inserting the phrase !important just before the terminating semicolon in a rule:

P.dark {color: #333 !important; background: white;}

Here, the color value of #333 is marked !important, whereas the background value of white is not. If you wish to mark both rules as important, then each rule will need its own !important:

P.dark {color: #333 !important; background: white !important;}

It is important to ensure that you place the !important correctly, or else the rule can be invalidated. The !important always goes at the end of the declaration, right before the semicolon. This is especially important -- no pun intended -- when it comes to properties that allow values which contain multiple keywords, such as font:

P.light {color: yellow; font: 11pt Times !important;}

If the !important were placed anywhere else in the font declaration, then that entire declaration would very likely be invalidated and none of the styles applied.

Rules that are marked !important do not have a defined specificity value, but authors can assume that they have a conveniently high value, such as 10,000 -- in other words, a value that outweighs all others. Note that while author-defined styles are treated as having a greater weight than reader-defined styles (see Section 2.8, "The Cascade", later in this chapter), the reverse is true of !important rules: important reader-defined rules take precedence over author-defined styles, even those marked !important.

Indeed, an !important rule will override the contents of an inline STYLE attribute. Thus, given the following code, the result will be gray text, not black:

H1 {color: gray !important;}
<H1 STYLE="color: black;">Hi there!</H1>

There is one last scenario to consider. Consider the following:

P#warn {color: red ! important;}
EM {color: black;}
<P ID="warn">This text is red, but <EM>emphasized text is black.</EM></P>

Remember that inherited values always have a specificity of 0. This is true even if the rule from which the value comes has an !important attached. All of its importance is lost outside the elements which match that rule.

WARNING

As of this writing, very few browsers implement !important. Internet Explorer 5 and Opera 3.6 have it right, but that's all. On the other hand, !important is expected to be supported in Navigator 6.



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P.wide {margin-left: -50px; width: auto; margin-right: 10px;border: 3px solid gray;}
Figure 8-20

Figure 8-20. Setting a negative left margin

In this case, not only does the paragraph spill beyond the borders ofthe DIV, but also beyond the edge of the browserwindow itself!

TIP

Remember that padding, borders, and content widths can never benegative. Only margins can be less than zero.does not exist. Those words were picked carefully because they helpexplain what's going on here. Since the border doesn'texist, it can't have any width, so the width is automaticallyset to 0 (zero). This may seem completelybackward, but it actually makes a great deal of sense. After all, ifa drinking glass is empty, you can't really describe it asbeing half-full of nothing. You can only discuss the depth of aglass's contents if it has actual contents. In the same way,talking about the width of a border only makes sense in the contextof borders that have some existence.

App server developers are not restricted to using HTTP, they can transmit and recieve XML information using simple remote CORBA objects and RMI objects. The key is that by using XML, it makes these remote services or objects easier to build. And, by sticking with XML, any one of these technologies can be used in your design of your app server. You can use whatever technology is most appropriate to getting the job done, knowing that all the information flows as XML and can be processed by any part of the system. The reason Java object serialization did not achieve this is because it encodes object data to a binary format that is dependent on too many things (like the JVM version, and the existence of classes when things are deserialized, etc). XML is not limited by any of these restrictions (or problems), which makes it much easier to create systems that allow XML information to flow between different subsystems. Also by relying only on the data, large portions of the system can be replaced with better or different implementations for future-readiness.

App servers traditionally give their client apps access to information in remote databases, remote file systems, remote object repositories, remote web resources, and even other app servers. All these information sources don't even need to reside on the machine that hosts the app server. These remote resources may be on other machines on the Intranet or the Internet. Using Java and XML, RMI, JDBC, CORBA, JNDI, Servlet and Swing, you can create app servers that can integrate all kinds of remote and local information resources, and client apps that allow you to remotely or locally access this information from the app server.

In the future, with publicly available DTDs that are standardized for each vertical industry, XML based app servers will become very popular. Also when XML schema repositories become available and widely used, app servers will be able to take on a new role and provide application services that are not offered now. Companies will need to share information with other companies in related fields, and each company might have a different software system in which all their data is housed. By agreeing upon a set of DTDs or schemas (encoded in XML), these companies can exchange information with each other regardless of what systems they are using to store this information. If their app servers can exchange XML documents (based on some shared DTD or schema), then these disparate app servers can understand each other and share information. One of the uses for XML foreseen by the W3C is just this, vertical industries (like insurance and health care) creating sets of DTDs and schemas that all companies in the industry agree upon. Then these companies' app servers can talk to each other using some popular protocol (like HTTP or CORBA/IIOP) to exchange information between each other. This has the potential to save a lot of time and money in the daily business operations of these companies.

Web-based Applications

because if they did, content might get overwritten by the background color of a following element. The CSS specification does not say what should happen when elements overlap in this manner; instead, it's left up to implementors to decide.

It has been argued that all foreground content is always shown "in front of " all background content, and the behavior of floated elements seems to support this interpretation. On the other hand, the CSS2 property z-index makes this reasoning more complicated. As of this writing, implementations haveblock are as follows:

  1. The containing block of the "root element" (also called the initial containing block) is established by the user agent. In HTML, the root element is the HTML element, although some browsers may incorrectly use BODY.