Book HomeCascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book Sunday 25th of February 2018 10:30:41 PM

Preface

The subject of this book is, as you might have guessed by the cover, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). There are two "levels" to CSS; these are referred to as CSS1 and CSS2. The difference between the two is that CSS2 is all of CSS1, plus a lot more. This book attempts to cover all of CSS1, and CSS positioning, which is a part of CSS2. The rest of CSS2 is excluded because, at the time of this writing, nobody had implemented most of it. Rather than cover a lot of theoretical territory, we chose to stick to what was currently usable.

If you are a web designer or document author interested in sophisticated page styling, improved accessibility, and saving time and effort, then this book is for you. All you really need before starting the book is a decent knowledge of HTML 4.0. The better you know HTML, of course, the better prepared you'll be. You will need to know very little else in order to follow this book.

It is important to remember something about web standards and books: the former are continually evolving, while the latter are frozen in time (until the next edition comes out, anyway). In the case of HTML and CSS, there are a great many changes afoot even as these words are being written. The recent formalization of XHTML 1.0 as a full W3C Recommendation, for example, is a major milestone in the evolution of the World Wide Web. There are likely to be even more levels to CSS, further extending the ability to style documents; major web browsers are approaching full CSS1 support, and robust CSS2 implementations can be seen lurking on the horizon. This is an exciting time to be a designer, and learning CSS now will give you a leg up on the future.

0.1. Typographical Conventions

The following typographical conventions are used in this book:

Constant width

is used to indicate code examples, HTML tags and CSS elements.

Constant width italic

From this simple example, we draw the general lesson that whenyou're planning to use styles, it's generally to youradvantage to plan ahead and use all of the tools you can. To take thepreceding example a little further, suppose that a navigational baris added to the page. Within this bar, hyperlinks should be yellow,not dark red. If the bar is marked with an ID ofnavbar, then you need only add this rule:

#navbar A:link {color: yellow;}

This will change the color of hyperlinks within the navigation bar

is used for replaceables that appear in text.

Italic

is used to introduce new terms and to indicate URLs, filenames, and pathnames.

TIP

indicates a note or tip relating to the nearby text.

WARNING

indicates a warning.



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In the future, with publicly available DTDs that are standardized for each vertical industry, XML based app servers will become very popular. Also when XML schema repositories become available and widely used, app servers will be able to take on a new role and provide application services that are not offered now. Companies will need to share information with other companies in related fields, and each company might have a different software system in which all their data is housed. By agreeing upon a set of DTDs or schemas (encoded in XML), these companies can exchange information with each other regardless of what systems they are using to store this information. If their app servers can exchange XML documents (based on some shared DTD or schema), then these disparate app servers can understand each other and share information. One of the uses for XML foreseen by the W3C is just this, vertical industries (like insurance and health care) creating sets of DTDs and schemas that all companies in the industry agree upon. Then these companies' app servers can talk to each other using some popular protocol (like HTTP or CORBA/IIOP) to exchange information between each other. This has the potential to save a lot of time and money in the daily business operations of these companies.

Web-based Applications

Web-based applications are similar to app servers, except for one thing: Web-based applications don't have client apps, instead they use web browsers on the client side. They generate their front ends using HTML, which is dynamically generated by the web-based app. In the Java world, Servlets are best suited for this job.

STRONG {color: rgb(255,128,128);}

Values

<color>

Default

UA specific

Inherited

yes

Applies to

all elements

plastic; this plastic represents the margins. The first piece of paper (say an H1 piece) is laid down on the canvas (browser window). The second (a paragraph) is laid below it and then slid up until the edge of one of the piece's plastic touches the edge of the other's content. If the first piece of paper has half an inch of plastic along its bottom edge, and the second has a third of an inch along its top, then when they slide together, the first piece's plastic will touch the top edge of the second piece of paper. The two are now done being placed on the canvas, and the plastic attached to the pieces is overlapping.</OL>
Figure 7-80

Figure 7-80. Switching off list-item markers

list-style-type is inherited, so if you want to have different styles of bullet in nested lists, you'll need to define them individually. You may also have to explicitly declare styles for nested lists because the user agent's style sheet may already have defined such styles. Assume that a UA has the following styles defined:

UL {list-style-type: disc;}