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Appendix B. HTML 2.0 Style Sheet

The style sheet provided in this chapter was excerpted from the CSS1 specification and is included here to give authors an idea of how legacy browser behavior in handling HTML can be reproduced, or at least approximated, using CSS1 rules. A thorough understanding of this style sheet is a good first step to understanding how CSS1 operates. The simpler HTML 2.0 style sheet is reproduced here in order to minimize complexity and possible confusion. A suggested style sheet for HTML 3.2 is also available on the W3C web site, as part of the CSS2 specification.

This HTML 2.0 style sheet was written by Todd Fahrner, in accordance with the suggested rendering in the HTML 2.0 specification: distance set for a whole host of properties. Without units, it wouldn't be possible to declare that a paragraph should be purple, or that an image should have ten pixels of blank space around it, or that a heading should be a certain size. By understanding the concepts put forth here, you'll be able to learn and use the rest of CSS much more quickly.

However, that's the good news. The bad news is that this chapter will contain a good many caveats, warnings, and discussions of browser bugs and inconsistencies between operating systems.

 BODY {
margin: 1em;
font-family: serif;
line-height: 1.1;
background: white;
color: black;
}
H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6, P, UL, OL, DIR, MENU, DIV,
DT, DD, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE, PRE, BR, HR { display: block }
B, STRONG, I, EM, CITE, VAR, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP,
IMG, SPAN { display: inline }
LI { display: list-item }
H1, H2, H3, H4 { margin-top: 1em; margin-bottom: 1em }
H5, H6 { margin-top: 1em }
H1 { text-align: center }
H1, H2, H4, H6 { font-weight: bold }
H3, H5 { font-style: italic }
H1 { font-size: xx-large }
H2 { font-size: x-large }
H3 { font-size: large }
B, STRONG { font-weight: bolder } /* relative to the parent */
I, CITE, EM, VAR, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE { font-style: italic }
PRE, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP { font-family: monospace }
PRE { white-space: pre }
ADDRESS { margin-left: 3em }
BLOCKQUOTE { margin-left: 3em; margin-right: 3em }
UL, DIR { list-style: disc }
OL { list-style: decimal }
MENU { margin: 0 }      /* tight formatting */
LI { margin-left: 3em }
DT { margin-bottom: 0 }
DD { margin-top: 0; margin-left: 3em }
HR { border-top: solid }   /* 'border-bottom' could also have been used */
A:link { color: blue }    /* unvisited link */
A:visited { color: red }   /* visited links */
A:active { color: lime }   /* active links */
/* setting the anchor border around IMG elements
requires contextual selectors */
A:link IMG { border: 2px solid blue }
A:visited IMG { border: 2px solid red }
A:active IMG { border: 2px solid lime }


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When you create your data using an XML editor (that you can write), you can not only input the content of your data, but also define the structural relationships that exist inside your data. By allowing you to define your own tags and create the proper structural relationships in your information (with a DTD), you can use any XML parser to check the validity and integrity of the data stored in your XML documents. This makes it very easy to validate the structure and content of your information when you use XML. Without XML, you could also provide this validation feature at the expense of developing the code to this yourself. XML is a great time saver because most of the features that are available in XML are used by most programmers when working on most projects.

By using XML and Java, you can quickly create and use information that is properly structured and valid. By using (or creating) DTDs and storing your information in XML documents, you have a cross-platform and language independent data validation mechanism (for free) in all your projects!

You might use XML to define file formats to store information that is generated and used by your applications. This is another use of the structured nature of XML. The only limitation is that binary information can't be embedded in the body of XML documents. For example, if you wrote a word processor in Java, you might choose to save your word processor documents to an XML (actually your ApplicationML) file. If you use a DTD then your word processor would also get input file format validation as a feature for free. There are many other advantages to using XML and a file storage format for your applications which will be illustrated later in the chapter.

Here are some benefits of the structured nature of XML: